Breakthrough Prize — 2023 Breakthrough Prize Nominations

“The Breakthrough Prize celebrates the great discoveries of our times, and the scientists who make them. It honors those at work in the fields that ask the biggest questions, seek the deepest explanations and have the most profound impact on humanity. The prize also aims to elevate the standing of science and inspire the next generation with an annual ceremony broadcast globally.”

January 16 2022 — Do you wish to nominate someone for the 2023 Breakthrough Prizes. Let us know! Science Matters. Follow us on Twitter: @INTEL_TODAY

RELATED POST: Sciences in the Media — New York Times editorial : “A Severe Strain on Credulity” (January 13, 1920)

“It is difficult to say what is impossible, for the dream of yesterday is the hope of today and the reality of tomorrow.”

Dr. Robert Hutchings Goddard

Dear Colleague,

We invite you to nominate for the 2023 Breakthrough Prizes.

The Breakthrough Prize celebrates the great discoveries of our times, and the scientists who make them. It honors those at work in the fields that ask the biggest questions, seek the deepest explanations and have the most profound impact on humanity.

The prize also aims to elevate the standing of science and inspire the next generation with an annual ceremony broadcast globally.

The nomination deadline is April 1, 2022 at https://breakthroughprize.org.

Life Sciences Prizes

3 Breakthrough Prizes in Life Sciences ($3 million each) – with 1 of the prizes designated for work contributing to the understanding of Parkinson’s disease and neurodegenerative disorders. Nominees should have produced transformative recent results.

Mathematics Prizes

• 1 Breakthrough Prize in Mathematics ($3 million)
• 3 New Horizons in Mathematics Prizes ($100,000 each) – for early-career researchers
• 3 Maryam Mirzakhani New Frontiers Prizes ($50,000 each) – for women mathematicians who have earned PhDs in the previous two years (2020, 2021)

Physics Prizes

• 1 Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics ($3 million)
• 3 New Horizons in Physics Prizes ($100,000 each) – for early-career researchers

Visit https://breakthroughprize.org for more information and to submit nominations.

We look forward to your participation. If you have any questions, contact Rob Meyer at
meyer@breakthroughprize.org.

Sincerely,

Huda Zoghbi, Selection Committee Chair
Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences

Christopher Hacon, Selection Committee Chair
Breakthrough Prize in Mathematics

Juan Maldacena, Selection Committee Chair
Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics

REFERENCES

On January 13, 1920, an unsigned New York Times editorial ridiculed Professor Goddard’s proposal to launch rockets beyond the atmosphere.

The basis of that criticism was the erroneous belief that thrust was produced by the rocket exhaust pushing against the atmosphere.

Forty-nine years after its editorial mocking Goddard, on July 17, 1969 — the day after the launch of Apollo 11 — The New York Times published a short item under the headline “A Correction.”

The three-paragraph statement summarized its 1920 editorial and concluded:

“Further investigation and experimentation have confirmed the findings of Isaac Newton in the 17th Century and it is now definitely established that a rocket can function in a vacuum as well as in an atmosphere. The Times regrets the error.”

A century later, nothing has changed. The clowns writing about 5G and the “Havana Syndrome” know absolutely nothing about sciences.

The New York Times, July 17, 1969, p. 43

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“We’ve arranged a global civilization in which most crucial elements profoundly depend on science and technology. We have also arranged things so that almost no one understands science and technology. This is a prescription for disaster. We might get away with it for a while, but sooner or later this combustible mixture of ignorance and power is going to blow up in our faces.”

Carl Sagan — The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark

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